35-times innovation

35-times innovation

Young innovators are shaking things up in fields ranging from Ai to legal services and farming

Young innovators are shaking things up in fields ranging from Ai to legal services and farming

Looking for 35 innovators aged under 35? We’ve got them in the shape of inventors, entrepreneurs, visionaries, humanitarians and pioneers, courtesy of the MIT Technology Review’s 35 Innovators aged under 35 compilation of such people.

On the invention side there’s Olga Russakovsky, an assistant professor at Princeton, who has devised a method of identifying objects in photos based partly on crowdsourcing. And that has led to AI systems capable of detecting 200 items, when machines could only ID around 20 just a few years back.

Keep an eye out for entrepreneur Bill Liu whose Royole start-up has come up with the world’s thinnest flexible displays that are as thin as an onion skin. The Chinese company is building a huge campus in Shenzhen and expects it facility to produce 50 million flexible panels a year on completion. Applications for the displays include smartphones, wearables, fashion design and the smart home.

Visionary Greg Brockman is the co-founder of non-profit research group OpenAI which is aiming to ensure that AI continues to benefit humanity as it increases in sophistication. And he believes a general AI system will need something close to a sense of shame to prevent it from misbehaving.

Among the humanitarians is Katherine Taylor, founder of India-based Khethworks, the builder of an affordable solar-powered irrigation system that lets farmers cultivate year-round. It’s based on a centrifugal pump with triple the efficiency of regular pumps which can be powered by one-third as many expensive photovoltaic panels.

And pioneer Joshua Browder is looking to upend the $200 billion legal services market with chatbots – via the DoNotPay tool – which he believes can do many of the tasks that lawyers charge a high hourly rate for.

“It should never be a hassle to engage in a legal process, and it should never be a question of who can afford to pay,” he says. “It should be a question of what’s the right outcome, of getting justice.”

For that deeper dive:

Indian start-up EM3 AgriServices is helping rural farmers literally get their hands on specialist equipment and machines that would ordinarily be out of their reach – TechCrunch

Microsoft Research has created an AI system which can keep a sailplane in the air without using a motor, by autonomously finding and catching rides on naturally occurring thermals – Neowin

 

Image: OpenAI

 

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