Driverless in gear

Driverless in gear

UK consumers are open to driverless cars but the government wants to guard against cyberattacks

UK consumers are open to driverless cars but the government wants to guard against cyberattacks

Four-out-of-five UK citizens are open to the idea of autonomous vehicles – with just 1% coming out against self-driving machines – while 55% saying that they feel able to trust driverless vehicles. The level of trust level depends on the specifics of each vehicle, with factors such as manufacturer, safety record and independent reviews having an influence, according to the Attitudes to AVs survey conducted by transportation centre TRL and Royal Holloway, University of London.

The most common concerns related to interactions between autonomous and non-autonomous vehicles in the early phases of rollout, along with software security. Other issues are the likelihood of problems with the technology in the early phases of introduction, along with the need for new policies and legislation to regulate the use of self-driving vehicles.

The UK last week issued security guidelines for connected and driverless cars. “Whether we're turning vehicles into Wi-Fi-connected hotspots or equipping them with millions of lines of code to become fully automated, it is important that they are protected against cyber-attacks,” the government says.

The new guidelines comprise eight principles, among them that systems be designed with a defence-in-depth approach, that there is a provision of product aftercare and incident response to ensure systems are secure over their lifetimes and that organisational security is owned and governed at board level.

Image: Greenwich Gateway

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