Uber over buses

Uber over buses

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Some 15% of ride-hailing trips with the likes of Uber and Lyft are adding cars to roads during morning or afternoon rush hours. And people who use public transit more often are more likely to drop it for ride hailing, even when they have to pay a lot more, and even when they have already stumped up for their transport with a monthly pass, says the MAPC in its survey of transport in and around Boston.

Four-fifths of surveyed trips were performed using standard single-customer services rather than pooled options such as Lyft Line or UberPOOL. Across both service types, a majority of users noted being the sole rider in their party.

That’s bad news for revenues.

“We estimate that the average ride-hailing trip represents 35 cents of lost fare revenue for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority,” says the MAPC.

Plus Uber et al pose a real threat to city mobility.

“Even if future ride-hailing vehicles were fully electric and autonomous, the region’s roadways could not accommodate unchecked growth in single-occupant vehicle travel.”

Image: MBTA

Funding fossil fuels

Going heavy on crypto

Going heavy on crypto