No Brexit creativity

No Brexit creativity

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The danger posed by Brexit to the UK creative sector is profound and the government’s intention to restrict freedom of movement has already damaged the country’s global reputation. “If we are to remain a creative leader attracting the brightest and best from around the world we must make every effort to maintain our reputation for openness and internationalism,” says the Creative Industries Federation in its the Global Talent Report.

“The fact that the average creative business has only 3.3 staff means many do not have access to expertise on complex issues such as visas and immigration,” the organisation says. “This puts them at a disadvantage when recruiting international workers in comparison to larger businesses in other industries.”

The creative sector employs an average proportion of EU workers (at 6.7%) but there is huge variation across subsectors, with 25% of architects non-UK EU citizens, and 30% of people working in visual effects. A workforce survey conducted by the federation found that 75% of business respondents employed EU nationals.

It adds that building an immigration system with favourable terms of entry for EU citizens will help secure reciprocal ease of movement for UK workers abroad. “It will also help support the export of creative goods and services to the EU which remains our biggest market. Sales and tours to the EU make up a significant proportion of the revenues of many UK creative businesses.”

The Independent Review of the Creative Industries Review recently proposed the deployment of a creative clusters strategy along with £500 million Creative Clusters Fund to deliver a creative sector model that also solves problems for other major parts of the economy.

Image: Creative Industries Federation

Citizen Sophia

Citizen Sophia

No more Kinect-edness