Tech gets sporty

Tech gets sporty

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The world’s leading technology firms are gearing up for serious play in the sports rights market, either in direct competition for premium rights, or through broader partnerships, with traditional broadcasters set to come increasingly under threat as the tech giants make incursions, warns PwC in its Sports Survey 2017 report.

In June, Facebook partnered with Fox Sports to stream over a dozen UEFA Champions League games in the US, including four quarter-final matches, and Fox won’t be airing some of the games that Facebook will stream.

More recently, Amazon outbid Sky to grab the UK rights for ATP men’s tennis events outside the four grand slams for £10 million, up from the £8 million a year Sky is paying with its current five-year deal that ends next.

This followed the online retail behemoth’s $50 million acquisition of the rights to stream 10 Thursday night NFL games in the US this season. And Amazon is looking to really leverage that deal, charging advertisers $2.8 million for packages with 30-second spots during games, which will be made available to Amazon Prime subscribers.

Intel is making inroads into sport with its tech solutions having cut a deal to deploy virtual reality, 360-degree video, artificial intelligence, drones and additional ‘silicon solutions’ to support the Olympics, as well as slotting advanced analytics into international cricket.

Image: PwC

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