The problem with 3D printing

The problem with 3D printing

3d printing not for consumers

3D printing probably isn't right for you. You see 3D printing is for businesses, not for consumers. Close to 220,000 3D printers will be sold around the globe in 2015, but companies will account for 95% of all 3D printed objects by volume, and for 99% by economic value, says Deloitte. And 3D-printed objects fitting into existing manufacturing processes will represent 90% of the 3D objects made by enterprises.

Those are the numbers. What's the problem on the consumer side? Domestic devices use limited-performance materials and cost around £30 per kilo, or more. They’re slow. The software isn’t easy. And the less-expensive home devices can be extremely difficult to calibrate, maintain and use.

However, they will have a place in schools. Learning how to use 3D printers - and the software tools needed to operate them - will be like learning woodworking or metalworking for past generations of students - enormously useful for those who will end up using 3D printers in their jobs, and still a positive learning experience for the rest,” says Deloitte.

So, the closest you get may be that 3D printed house of yours.

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