Behaviour of things

Behaviour of things

Internet of Things

Ready yourself for ‘empathy tech’. That’s because a new breed of social machines are becoming integrated into our daily lives. And these devices and systems can understand a wider range of human needs and behaviours “to provide relevant assistance and support at key moments”. This opens the possibility of more intimate relationships with the objects in our lives, says the Living Within The Internet of Things report from PFSK and Intel.

Like what? Behavioural nudges, for example. By popping at key junctures with prompts, systems can nudge people towards smarter decisions in the moment. Such as designerLucas Neumann’s rejig of the traditional stress ball in the shape of Bossy. But beware, Bossy can be rather, erm, bossy by blocking social media feeds to avoid outside distractions. And it will also come up with work-based games to incentivise Bossees to reach their personal goals.

Plus there’s iBag, a ‘location-enabled purse’ which can prevent shoppers from overspending by helping them avoid the stores where they cough up the most by simply locking up that cash or card. GPS is used to warn users when they’re getting too close to a favourite shop. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

“Implantable chips that monitor the number of steps we take, hours we sleep, all of our vital signs, blood chemistry and beyond,” exhorts Clara Shih, CEO of Hearsay Social. “The chip data will be used to adjust our medications, offer suggestions to change our behaviour and automatically send an ambulance — self-driving, of course.”

But please don’t let Bossy get in on this.

Essential music brands

Essential music brands

Sony hands music to Spotify

Sony hands music to Spotify