Blurred lives

Blurred lives

Future work

Dell and Intel have, unsurprisingly, come up with a bullish report on the effects of technology in the Global Evolving Workforce Study. According to one of the findings, a quarter of employees say they are influenced by the technology offered to them at work and would consider moving on if a prospective employer provided better technology to help them be more productive. And almost half of employees say technology has increased their productivity and enabled them to communicate more quickly. All of which is great news for companies looking to get more out of workers.

These global respondents are really buying into the power of tech and are keen to see those future devices, says the report. A majority thinks voice recognition will be used instead of the keyboard (92%), tablets will completely replace laptops (87%), all computers will use hand gestures (87%), and keyboards and mice will be obsolete (88%).

Luckily, “work life plus personal life equals life”, say Silicon Messiahs Dell and Intel. Because “as innovations in technology continue to advance, people have increasing flexibility to choose when and where they meet their professional obligations.”

Which means they can work at home as well as in the workplace, and be even more productive for the same salary.

Steve Lalla, general manager of cloud client computing at Dell knows a good thing when he sees it. “Now more than ever, the ‘office’ isn’t defined by a desk within an employer’s walls,” he says. “With constant connectivity blurring the lines between professional and personal lives and devices, its essential employees have access to data when at the office, at home and on the road so they can stay productive.”

Which goes to show just how wrong Goldman Sachs was last year when it foolishly announced a weekend work blackout with strictly no BlackBerry’s allowed. Then JPMorgan Chase slavishly followed the example… as did Citigroup, Barclays, Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse and Bank of America.

Connecting Silicon

Connecting Silicon

Music’s essential brands

Music’s essential brands