TV seven ways

TV seven ways

Are you looking for seven dynamics transforming TV? We’ve got ’em, courtesy of Google Think. And these seven magnificent dynamics represent new and old challenges that television programmers and distributors have been dealing with for the past 60 years, we’re told. We are talking about delivery, advertising and the viewer experience, and about people’s expectations of how and when they get their programming.

First up, well, we’re all aware TV programmes can now target audiences across devices and over time. While that sounds great, this makes things much harder for programmers and can actually mean reducing viewer reach. However, if you’re more of an optimist, the multi-screen landscape offers advertisers new ways to engage with their audiences and ones which can be tailored to a screen/device. Goodbye one-size-fits-all.

And there’s Internet TV streaming. People, quite understandably, want a TV-over-the-Net experience that’s as good as, or better than, watching the same content on trad TV. What they don’t like is buffering or pixellation. Google says tech advancements allow OTT TV to dynamically adjust the quality of the video stream, based on everything from device type, to screen size to connection speed. Now, that may well be, but there are still some pretty ropey viewing experiences out there.

Google also reckons failure to design for the cloud will lead to unsustainable costs. Cloud services will provide agility and programmers can benefit from the ‘cloudification’ of their TV syndication workflows and new business models, it seems.

Let’s not forget metrics. Here we’re talking better, more accurate, more actionable audience measurement. “With a trusted census + panel approach to digital GRP measurement, the exact size and demographics of an audience can be known in real time,” Google says. Though a GRP that represents the total audience size and demographic across all screens is just the beginning…

It’s hard to avoid programmatic, and not adopting programmatic ad technology to automate buying and selling will result in inefficient processes. Google points out that, for programmers and broadcasters, ad tech can help with ad decision-making, insertion and monetisation across a range of direct,private, preferred or open trading scenarios, letting them maximise inventory.

Let’s talk addressable advertising. Most TV advertising is broadly cast, as is the content, and every viewer nationally/regionally, sees the same programming and adverts. With TV over the Internet, though, ads don’t have to be the same for everyone. Google reckons tailored advertising means an improved viewing experience for the user. But with the digital targeting efforts we’ve seen to date, there’s some ways to go on that.

Did we say seven? We did. Let’s finish with engagement. Google’s actually only talking about advertising now – who cares about that show? – or, better still, uniquely addressable TV spots which “empower advertisers to improve ad performance by delivering a range of messages, depending on circumstance”.

TV over the Net is ripe for ad innovations such as longer-form opt-in advertising, or ads with more direct calls to action. There’s also mention of skippable ads, which takes us back to the early days of Tivo…

Lucky Lykke

Lucky Lykke

Social ads a plenty

Social ads a plenty